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Noodle Vendor

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Kauai, Hawai'i

New Brunswick, NJ, USA, 8 - 12 April 2009

Between the 8th and 11th of April, the National Association of Chicano/Chicana (Mexican-American) Studies will have their annual national academic conference in New Brunswick. This is the first time the Association brings its meeting of 500+ people to the Northeast! It is also the association’s fortieth anniversary. The Department of Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies, with the support of the SAS Dean’s office and other units, will be the local host for this conference.

For more information, please visit http://www.naccs.org/naccs/General_Info_EN.asp?SnID=941918868.

The XXXVI NACCS Conference theme examines the legacy, present, and future of Chicana and Chicano Studies. As the first decade of the new millennium comes to a close, Chicana and Chicano Studies remains the site for radical and innovative scholarship about the experience and cultural production of Chicanas and Chicanos. Through the development and adoption of revolutionary critical frameworks, Chicana and Chicano scholars have broadened the discipline to include relevant fields like Environmental Justice, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Urban Studies. As we move forward, it is time to examine the legacy of Chicana and Chicano Studies. The year 2009 marks the fortieth year anniversary of key developments in Chicana and Chicano Studies. At the height of the Movimiento in 1969, activists and scholars came together to define what Chicana and Chicano Studies was to be. In Colorado, Corky Gonzalez and the Crusade for Justice organized the First National Chicano LiberationYouth Conference. During the conference, Alurista presented the Plan Espiritual de Aztlán calling for nationalism and self-determination. At the University of California – Santa Barbara, members of the Chicano Coordinating Council on Higher Education met to discuss the implementation of Chicana and Chicano Studies programs in California. The document they produced would become El Plan de Santa Barbara and lay out one of the foundations for Chicana and Chicano Studies. Far from perfect, both plans and their authors were to be criticized within our communities and outside. From within, their silence about the many contributions of women and queer Raza was to be questioned by a generation of activists and intellectuals, including NACCS Scholars Gloria Anzaldúa and Cherrie Moraga. From outside, their call for radical, educated, and organized Chicanas and Chicanos was seen as threatening to the status quo. Today, they continue to draw scholarly attention and criticism.

These two plans emerged from a history activism of Chicanas and Chicanos angered by the institutional and structural barriers that prevented the advancement of La Raza. The previous year, in 1968, community activism brought the foundation of the first Chicana and Chicano Studies program at California State University Los Angeles. By the early 70s, more Chicana and Chicano Studies programs and departments emerged throughout the US. Today, Chicana and Chicano Studies is a prominent and recognized discipline worldwide.

What will the next forty years of Chicana and Chicano Studies bring?

NACCS invites submissions of paper, panel, workshop, and roundtable presentations that examine the legacy, present, and future of Chicana and Chicano Studies. We especially welcome proposals addressing the intersection of Chicana and Chicano Studies with other interdisciplinary areas, in particular Environmental Justice, Gender and Sexuality, and Urban Studies. The organization also welcomes critical reflections on the relationship between Chicana and Chicano Studies and other Ethnic Studies programs, including, but not limited to, Latina and Latino Studies, Puerto Rican Studies, Central American Studies, African American Studies, Native American Studies, and Asian Studies. Please submit your proposals no later than October 15, 2008, online at: www.naccs.org

Acceptance notices will be sent via email by January 31, 2009. Questions should be sent to Chair-Elect, Nohemy Solórzano-Thompson via email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Contact Us

77 Hamilton Street


77 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08901


P   848-932-7896
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